SHIFT's eLearning Blog

Our blog provides the best practices, tips, and inspiration for corporate training, instructional design, eLearning and mLearning.

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6 Knowledge Retention Strategies For More Effective eLearning

We all forget sometimes. But there is a pattern in our forgetfulness.  We forget names and faces that we learned just a week ago, yet we remember characters from a movie that we had watched decades earlier. We forget the dates we had learned in history class back in school, but we remember all the details of a chemistry experiment from the same period. We forget some stories, but some others remain etched in our minds even years after we have read them. As an instructional designer, you want to decode this pattern. You want to know why people remember certain events and information and not others because you want your learners to remember what you teach. You want them to retain knowledge for the long term. That's our ultimate goal, right? Ensuring that learners remember the knowledge till the time they get the opportunity to apply it is critical for the success of your training program. But it is easier said than done. Also read: These Are The Reasons Why Learners Forget Your Training

6 Strategies to Promote Transfer of Learning In the Workplace

Learning something once is enough of a challenge—so how are your employees doing when it comes to retaining that information in the long term? Training leaders have a simple goal: teach workers to do their job more effectively. They try to give them the skills and knowledge they need to succeed in their day-to-day activities, but more often than not, it’s this translation from theory to practice that trips people up. Companies expect employees to get back to work after training and figure out for themselves how to incorporate their learning into their work. No matter how great your eLearning course is—no matter how engaging the content—participants in your course might leave the program feeling, or being, unprepared to actually apply what you have taught them. That application is called “learning transfer,” and when it’s lacking, the company has effectively wasted its time and money training its employees. Without some sort of strategy for reinforcing skills after the end of the training, 90% of the course’s content could fall right out of the learners’ ears. Read more about how to tackle this “challenge of training transfer” here.  Luckily,  training leaders can make the content of their eLearning courses really stick if they follow some simple tricks. Here are some ideas to help your employees apply what they’ve learned:

Four Ways to Create an Effective mLearning Strategy

Chief learning officers, learning leaders, and training coordinators everywhere are well aware of the need to increase mobile training programs. After all,  74% of employees say they access resources from their smartphones to do their jobs— and that number is expected to continue to grow. 

How to Design Microlearning Around Moments of Need

Let’s be honest: your employees use smartphones and tablets every day, everywhere — including in your workplace.

  • 8 min read
  • Thu, Jun 16, 2022 @ 04:44 PM

The Basics of Motivational eLearning Design

When we think of the word, motivation, instantly two things come to mind. First, when we are young, many outside things motivate us, a desire to do something, the reality of punishment from our parents, positive and negative reinforcement of what we are doing, etc. All of these things help to motivate children, and in some cases, it has a positive effect, and in other cases, it does not. The more proactive the motivation, the more positive the response to that motivation, the more reactionary the motivation, the more negative the response. The second picture that comes to mind is a learned reaction to something. Like Pavlov and his dogs, which would salivate when he rang the bell, motivation can be at times subconscious. However, there are much more things that drive the motivation of human beings, and in the arena of learning, there are some critical pieces to the puzzle that have to be developed so that learners feel the value of what they are learning and how it will benefit them. The rewards of their success must be considered from a variety of sources and satisfy them on a variety of levels, and as instructional designers of e-learning programs, we must not only understand these factors but be skilled in utilizing them in the courses that we design.

8 Tips for Getting Started with E-Learning Course Design

eLearning designers are often the unsung heroes of effective online learning experiences. They have the powerful role of being the ones that build the content provided by the subject matter expert into a robust and engaging narrative for the learner. However, getting there isn't easy.  If you are just starting out, you aren't going to become an expert on day one. But if you follow some expert advice, your road to success will be much smoother.  This is a compilation of some things we wish we knew when starting out as a new eLearning designer. 

5 Strategies to Organize eLearning Content Effectively

It is time to set up a new eLearning course. That sounds simple enough, at least in theory. Sit down, draw up objectives for what the course is expected to convey to students. Get curriculum prepared to meet those objectives. Prepare assessments to determine how effective you were in presenting information to those who participated in the eLearning course. And you might think you're ready....  But, not really!  You have to make sure your course is designed taking into consideration how students learn best.  Research has proved that the order and organization of learning activities affect the way information is processed and retained (Glynn & DiVesta, 1977; Lorch & Lorch, 1985; Van Patten, Chao, & Reigeluth, 1986).    Text-Organization Effect The concept refers to the effects that the structural elements of the course have on the information learners encode and remember. This effect relies on the fact that learners’ comprehension is influenced by the text structure used to convey the information. Moreover, it says that our brains like the organization of information, which is why chapters, outlines, and sections are highly recommended as an instructional method. To properly organize and sequence content, you’ll first need to consider:  How to use concept or mind-mapping for analyzing content (to determine which concepts build on others and should be presented first, and know how much to include and what to eliminate.) Get to know your learners (These 27 Questions Will Help You (Really) Know Your Learners) And...Answer these 7 questions before choosing a structure

A List of Brain-based Strategies to Create Effective eLearning

There is a simple way to design effective eLearning courses about any subject: brain-based learning. This instructional approach was defined by Hileman in 2006 and has since inspired many “brain-compatible designers” — those who seek to understand the principle and reasoning behind their teaching.

  • 14 min read
  • Thu, May 26, 2022 @ 01:11 PM

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