SHIFT's eLearning Blog

Our blog provides the best practices, tips, and inspiration for corporate training, instructional design, eLearning and mLearning.

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    Diana Cohen

    Diana Cohen

    Education Writer | eLearning Expert | EdTech Blogger. Creativa, apasionada por mi labor, disruptiva y dinámica para transformar el mundo de la formación empresarial.

    Recent Posts:

    5 Reasons Why Learners Forget Your Online Training Content

    "Training doesn’t help one jot if people can’t remember it in the real world"  —Teresa Ewington Our biggest goal in training is to get students to remember the material. To do this more effectively, it helps to learn what causes the mind to forget things. By getting a clear view of what makes a person forget, we can incorporate key elements into our programs that help counteract those causes.  Forgetting is an important function. It helps a human filter out trivial things that would clog the brain and override important information. Forgetting helps ease the pain of tragedy and enables a person to continue living without constant sadness. There are times, however, when we not only need to remember but need to do so at a time when the information is useful. Let's take a look at the five most common reasons your corporate learners forget your training.

    The Empowered Learner: 4 Things L&D Professionals Need to Know

    In today's fast-paced, technology-driven world, it's crucial to update our training methods to meet the needs of modern learners. This goes beyond simply incorporating technology and addressing shortened attention spans. It's about equipping the workforce with the tools they need to feel satisfied in their jobs and to be valuable assets to the company as a whole. To achieve this, it's essential to say goodbye to traditional methods such as long lectures and dense presentations. These methods are not only tedious but also ineffective. Today's learners thrive on engagement, interaction, and personalization. By adopting new methods that focus on active learning and providing real-life examples, we can ensure that our workforce is equipped with the skills and knowledge they need to excel in their roles.

    Adult Learning Theories Every Instructional Designer Must Know

    As an instructional designer, you want to create courses that make a difference in your audience’s lives. You want to create experiences that inspire them, change mindsets and drive performance. In short, you want to create courses that resonate with them and hit the mark, every time.

    Five Rules of Engagement All eLearning Designers Should Live By

    As a course designer, you are eager to offer the most helpful and engaging courses available to employees. However, to succeed in this mission, you must create the perfect balance between the right information, a memorable online experience, and an intuitive path from start to finish. So, how do you do this? Check out the savviest tips and tricks that can guarantee you create this desired balance in your courses. Being aware of each of these points will remove rookie mistakes that get in the way of a positive learning experience.

    Learning Is Not a One-Time Event! How to Promote Lifelong Learning In Your Company

    In the ever-changing corporate world, where new technology one day becomes an ancient relic by the next, companies need to establish a culture of Lifelong Learning. The old days of training your workforce one time and then never developing their skills and knowledge again? Those days are fading fast into the sunset!  "Employees who don’t spend at least 5 to 10 hours a week developing new skills will obsolete themselves with the technology,” -  AT&T CEO Randall Stephenson    In response, companies are looking for ways to reinforce continuous learning in their workplaces. 

    How to Turn Your Employees into Lifelong Learners

    A fat paycheck? Yes, but not always. The corner office within the next five years? Yes sure, but what about now? 401(k) plan. Health and dental insurance. Paid vacation. Well, these would be nice. What do you think is the single biggest factor that motivates employees to work at a company? According to Bersin by Deloitte’s research with Glassdoor, learning, and career opportunities are mentioned as the highest priorities by employees. Employees know that in an ever-changing and volatile workplace, there is only ONE way to make oneself indispensable. Keep growing. Keep learning. Innovate consistently. Companies like Yahoo,  BlackBerry, and Blockbuster failed to keep up with the times. The result: they continued to lag till the day when they were forced to give up. Innovation is the game-changer. It is true not only for organizations but also for individuals. This is why companies are able to lure valuable employees away from their rivals with the promise of training opportunities. As an HR or training professional, you have to keep your employees engaged in working for the company by providing them with ample learning opportunities. They need to improve their skills, increase productivity, and be on top of their game, so your business can out-innovate its rivals, tide over disruptions, and respond to market changes.

    Here’s Everything You Need to Know About Self-Directed Learning at the Workplace

    Self-directed learning (SDL) is on the minds of many L&D professionals right now. Training managers, HR professionals, and instructional designers want to promote this strategy at the workplace because it facilitates the creation of a robust and sustainable learning culture in the organization.  In this post, learn about the features and benefits of SDL and how you can implement this learning model at the workplace to turn reluctant and dispassionate learners into dedicated and inspired ones.

    3 Keys to Embracing a Culture of Self-Directed Learning in the Workplace

    Lifelong learning is now more important than ever. Technology has brought about many changes in the workplace, and those companies that don’t adapt at the speed of change risk being left behind.  The Future of Jobs 2020 Report by The World Economic Forum revealed: Skills gaps continue to be high as in-demand skills across jobs change in the next five years. The top skills that employers see as rising in prominence in the lead-up to 2025 include critical thinking and analysis as well as problem-solving, and skills in self-management such as active learning and flexibility. On average, companies estimate that around 40% of workers will require reskilling and 94% of business leaders report that they expect employees to pick up new skills on the job, a sharp uptake from 65% in 2018. A significant expansion of remote work is expected in the next few years— employers see the potential to move 44% of their workforce to operate remotely. Since the pandemic started, online learning is on the rise. There has been a four-fold increase in the number of individuals seeking out opportunities for learning online through their own initiative, a five-fold increase in employer provision of online learning opportunities to their workers, and a nine-fold enrolment increase for learners accessing online learning through government programs. 50% of employers will speed up the automation of tasks, while over 80% are set to expand the digitization of their work processes. In other words, jobs will disappear, and new jobs will surge. Specifically, they predict around 85 million roles are set to be displaced by automation and 97 million new jobs will emerge by 2025. All these shifts happening so fast require employees to take greater control over their learning journey and at the same time, require leaders to act fast to ensure workers have the right information at the right moment.  A lifelong learning approach cannot be forced. That's why there's a huge opportunity for leaders in companies to focus their L&D efforts on empowering employees to embrace lifelong learning and promoting self-directed learning. In the end, not only companies are the ones that will receive benefits for this... lifelong, self-directed employees are the ones who will thrive in a rapidly changing world. Prioritizing self-directed learning and embedding it into a well-integrated ecosystem is key to developing adaptive and flexible workers that are prepared to navigate uncertain times and the future of work.  A lifelong learning approach cannot be forced.  Lifelong, self-directed employees are the ones who will thrive in a rapidly changing world.

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